landscapes

related photos

Aura photography
Christmas. This is what Christmas should look like: real tree, real candles, real light, real Christmas carols (at least the beginning of carols and the chorus) in the background, of course, the real Christmas story. Jesus Christ, Bethlehem, the Three Kings on the road from the Orient, stars and angels everywhere, that goes without saying – who believes is blessed – as invented tradition linked to real feelings, detectable on the cerebral cortex. And to take a real photograph of all this is possible, even necessary, because it then turns Christmas into Christmas for our senses. And that means it is only made visible as a complete work of art in reality and the aura is photographed in passing. It is therefore still possible: the work of art in the age of its technical reproducibility and associating it with the term aura! Little cameras should be hung on the Christmas tree out of sheer gratitude. That is art! Rainer Totzke

Landscapes in the living room
A room with a door onto other rooms. A closed window. Outside emptiness. In the room, contours appear in the darkness: Rises, falls, light refractions, hollows, depths and highlights. Light that surrounds. Light that is created in the darkness. The walls recede, widen, the corners of the room dissolve.
Lush darkness. The room disappears. A landscape is created. In it, more landscapes lie: mountains, plains, faraway cities, motorway networks, jagged regions. They spread out, map themselves onto the dim area of the room, etch themselves into the walls, multiply and get lost in an endlessly fanned out, dimly-lit room.
Behind the door is darkness, behind the window is a black emptiness – in the instant that the photograph was taken, and in the view that the photographer took in.
Velvety darkness and an endless depth in the room. A mise en scéne that is revived every year. That makes the room disappear, makes a place for lost pictures. Pictures of longing. Landscape pictures. Darkness pictures. Light landscapes. Light that creates narrow contours, highlights, individual spectrums, just so that the floating view can find its way in that endless room landscape. Birgit Szepanski

 
Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.